How To Care For and Grow Your Lucky Bamboo

Scientifically, the plant which is commonly referred to as Lucky Bamboo is in fact a member of the Dracaena family (Dracaena Sanderiana), a plant which is well known for their durability under adverse indoor conditions. Because of its ease of care and its apparent resemblance to the true bamboo, many species of Dracaena are now cultivated.

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Caring for your lucky bamboo, keeping it alive and healthy for years is very easy. There are two simple rules for maintaining your lucky bamboo:

      • Keep roots below water at all times
      • Keep plant out of direct sunlight

    Watering your Lucky Bamboo

    Lucky bamboo stalks in water

    In areas where water is heavily treated with chlorine or fluoride (particularly in city water), the tips of the leaves or edge of the lucky bamboo may become yellow or brown. thus, simply allow your water to rest for 24 hours before using, allowing the chlorine and fluoride to dissipate.

    Light Conditions

     

    Lucky bamboo grows naturally under the shady canopies of taller rain forest trees. Thus, perfect conditions for a strong and healthy plant is any indoor location with no direct sunlight. They will also grow well under artificial lighting, such as in office buildings. 

    Feeding your Lucky Bamboo

    Super green lucky bamboo plant food fertilizer

    Most local water provides no nutrients, the best for for lucky bamboo plants is the use of a very dilute solutions of plant food. Our Super Green Fertilizer is pre-mixed for lucky bamboo. Because lucky bamboo does not use soil to buffer the fertilizer acids and salts, the roots are easily burned if the solution is too strong (i.e. diluting Miracle Grow is too strong and will harm the plant)

     

    If you follow these simple steps, your lucky bamboo plant will flourish, have a long healthy life and continue to grow as big as the environment it is in. 

     


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